• Raised beds or planters supported on blocks can bring the garden up to a wheelchair friendly height.
  • Gardening can be aided by using a length of plastic tubing as a conduit for planting seeds when seated in a wheelchair.
  • The dimples on a rubber thimble provide friction to help turn the pages of a book or magazine.
  • Where possible get books in electronic/digital form, or have someone scan them in pdf format so they can be read from a screen.
  • Consult on-line versions of newspapers if trying to handle a broadsheet on your own is proving difficult.
  • Check with your local library for information on how they can supply books to those who are housebound and also ask about what alternative formats they have.
  • For fishermen who have difficulty retrieving a line, several devices are available, including a vest with a lightweight harness which holds the fishing rod in an aluminum tube with a locking feature. Also obtainable is an electronic fishing reel featuring a four‑speed control with two manual and two electronic settings.
  • A spring‑loaded billiard cue is available for billiards or pool players who lack strength enough to handle the standard cue.
  • If you want to play a stringed instrument (guitar, banjo, ukulele, etc.) but have weak hands and wrists, a soft glove can be modified by gluing individual plastic picks onto the fingers, adding a Velcro strap (for quick sizing) at the wrist and opening the thumb area for easy removal. The glove facilitates plucking and strumming stringed instruments by moving the fingers in a clawing manner, either separately or together.
  • For those who sew, a small magnet glued to the end of a garden cane makes an effective retriever for dropped pins and needles.