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New treatment for excessive drooling in MND

The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) has approved a new treatment to help reduce excessive drooling in adults with neurological conditions.

Posted : 11/11/2019

Following input from MND Scotland and other neurological charities, the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) has announced the acceptance of a new treatment to help reduce excessive drooling due to neurological conditions in adults.

Up to half of people with MND will experience Sialorrhoea, or excessive drooling, due to signals from the brain failing to reach the muscles. People with MND do not produce any more saliva than anyone else, but instead cannot control it.

Sialorrhoea can increase the risk of choking and causes skin problems, infections, sleep disturbance and difficulties in eating and speaking. It can also lead to embarrassment, loss of dignity, and distress for both people with MND, and their family carers.

One person with MND said: “It's the most prominent ailment that I have to suffer. It affects every part of my daily life.” and another said, “My family have to tend to wiping my mouth constantly and I cannot be left alone for any length of time. I am embarrassed to have wet clothes, especially in front of my grandchildren.”

Xeomin is a medicine which can be used for the treatment of chronic Sialorrhoea. It is injected into the salivary glands to decrease the production of saliva.  This medicine has now been approved for use in NHS Scotland for people with neurological conditions.

The decision will allow health boards with the proper equipment and training to offer Xeomin injections as an additional choice to patients, alongside current secretion management methods such as suction.

Craig Stockton, Chief Executive of MND Scotland, said: “Sialorrhoea can be a challenging symptom for people with MND to manage, on top of rapidly losing the ability to speak, walk, eat and drink, and breathe unaided.

“We conducted a survey with people affected by MND, which showed that excessive drooling most negatively impacts on voice quality, and causes distress and embarrassment. Therefore I’m delighted that this medicine has now been approved for use on the NHS. I’d like to thank everyone with MND who put forward their experiences and views to ensure the approval of this treatment.

“Xeomin is not a treatment or cure for MND, and while we are working hard to find these, it is important to help give people the best quality of life possible, and to help manage the symptoms of MND.”

Dr. George Gorrie, Consultant Neurologist at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, said: “This is a new option to help treat one of the symptoms individuals with MND can suffer from.”

For more information about Xeomin, speak to your MND Clinical Specialist.

Additional information:

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“I’m delighted that this medicine has now been approved for use on the NHS. I’d like to thank everyone with MND who put forward their experiences and views to ensure the approval of this treatment.”

Craig Stockton | Chief Executive

Craig Stockton | Chief Executive

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